Wednesday, July 4, 2012

Modeling, Book Boxes - D5, Chapter 4 and a FREEBIE Linky!


Our hosts for the week:






     First Grade Blue Skies    
 

I love this quote from page 45:
Just adding more time and space for independent reading is not enough. I'm advocating a carefully designed, structured reading program that includes demonstrating, teaching, guiding, monitoring, evaluating, and goal setting along with voluntary reading of books students choose...
~Regie Routman





I think what really struck me the most about this chapter is the modeling that needs to take place in order to *teach* students how to think about what they are reading to increase comprehension. The sisters say it this way: "...modeling the metacognitive process of thinking aloud about our reading and comprehension that we will soon expect students to replicate (pg. 48)." This is definitely an area where my teaching has lacked. :-(

Remember, I have not done D5 before. We use a basal and it has these metacognitive process comments and questions in the teacher's guide that I should be following. I just know I have not done a good job with it and want to do better this coming year.

My challenges still remain...book boxes and TIME. If you haven't already, check out my schedule and tell me your thoughts please.

Book Boxes HELP! I have virtually no classroom library. My students get to go to the library twice a week and the librarian does a lesson and/or activity with them then allows them to check out two books. Does anyone else rely on the school library for their boxes? How do you make this work? What do you all use for book boxes? Would it be a good idea to include my levelized readers that go with my reading series in there (they would get a new one each week)?

One problem solved! I was able to talk to the computer tech this week and found out that I should be able to get 2 or 3 laptops (in addition to my 2 student computers) for Listen to Reading, but I will have to check them out and back in each day. Ugh! I plan to have the kiddos listen to the main selection first. Then they can either listen to some of our previous stories or do some of the computer activities that go along with our reading series for the week if they have extra time.

Please comment with thoughts and suggestions for me. I'd love to read them!

Also, you have to head over to visit Erin at First with Franklin. She is celebrating 100 followers by having a FREEBIE Linky Party! What could be better than all those freebies found in one central location? LOVE IT, Erin! Thanks!!!

Happy 4th of July!!!

Crystal

Go to Chapter FIVE

**If you are linking up with the Blog Hop, it is especially helpful if you click GET THE CODE HERE below. Once you copy the code, in Blogger as you edit your post, click on HTML in the top left corner and paste the code at the bottom of your post. That way as we are clicking through blogs, we don't have to keep going back to someone who has the hop at the bottom to find all the great posts!

21 comments:

  1. I looked at your schedule, and think you could definitely use D5 during your Tier Time. I have Title help, and she pulls out 3 kids at a time for 15 min. We just keep working right around her. I'm pulling kids and the others are in choice time. I'll teach a mini-lesson that those kids can miss (because they're receiving the same instruction from Title.) I don't make it through all 5 choices every day, and that's ok. We just pick up where we left off the next day. You could also require a Read to Self and a Work on Writing, and the other choices could be optional.
    I use tote bags for my book boxes. They're cheap, and a parent mends the ones that can be mended to stretch them a little further.
    The best way to build up enough of what you need is to ask! Ask parents to donate books and bags, ask the other teachers in your building for books and bags, ask local businesses for books and bags, ask your own family members for books and bags. I use local thrift stores for books--10 cents each! I watch for free stuff constantly--teacher appreciation days at office supply stores, free days for teachers at the library book sale, giveaways online.
    I do allow students to use library books that they check out and that I check out in their book bags. Sometimes I've paid for a book at the end of the year, but often I don't. Stock up on 50 books at a time to provide a good choice. I don't have them put required reading in their book bags; I save the bags for what they've chosen.
    Hope this helps!

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  2. I second thrift stores for purchasing books. I also suggest garage sales, your local library to check and see if they have a "store" or friends of the library sale and craigslist. I also use scholastc book clubs and their bonus points.

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    1. Thanks, Catherine. I'll have to get busy! :-)

      Crystal

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  3. Some teachers sell bundles of books on ebay. I've gotten listening center books that way. Also, check and see if your school or district has any "old" leveled readers- you know from the previous Reading Series ya'll used. That is what I am going to try and use. :)

    Thanks for linking up!
    Laura
    tattling to the teacher

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    1. Thanks! I'll have to look into our old reading materials and stalk ebay! Ha ha!

      Crystal

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  4. Great questions! I'm new to the D5 as well, so I love hearing from those who have already implemented. I have a giant library, and I've used thrift stores, garage sales, and the scholastic book orders (kids buy certain amounts, teacher gets free books, plus all the book points)to build it. I also know that our public library lets teachers check out 40 books at a time. That might be an option too.
    I'm trying to figure out my schedule as well. We've got so much we have to do, that adding additional things seem overwhelming. It may end up being the case where you don't get the whole "5" in, but maybe only "2 or 3" to start?

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  5. I am realizing that all 5 is just not doable with my schedule. :-( I like what someone suggested though that you had 1 or 2 required so they at least get Read to Self and Writing in... I also just saw a blog where they start their day with Read to Self...put their things away and get started. Seems like a good thing - instead of "busy" morning work while I'm doing attendance, etc. I'll have to think about that...

    Crystal

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  6. Great thoughts! I would definitely include your leveled books in the kids book boxes. It would be good fluency practice for them to read and reread the story. Maybe you could let them keep them for longer than a week? That would allow more selection in their book boxes. Hope that helps!

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    1. Thanks, Anne. I suppose the readers could be in there longer than a week! Thanks!

      Crystal

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  7. I like all of the suggestions you have been getting! I was able to really build my library by asking the 5th grade teachers to send home a note asking for books that their 'soon to be' middle schooler was done reading. I put out boxes at the front of the school office and outside of my room. Sending home a "Calling All Books" notice by email helped too! There were a good number of books that were inappropriate for our age group- but I donated those to the local library and ones that were way too young - gave to the preschool or daycare center. Win-win for all! Good Luck!

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  8. In Classrooms that Work, by Cunningham. She suggests rotating book boxes on tables. The students have one week to read and look through the book boxes on the table. Here is the direct quote: " The teacher often places a crate of good reading material at each student grouping, just in case anyone needs something additional to read.) Magazines would also be a great resource: Ranger Rick, Big Backyard, scholastic News, Weekly Reader, Time for Kids, Jack and Jill, Children's Digest, Zoobooks, just to name a few. I loved the quote you chose!

    I also became your latest follower. I would love to have you come by and visit my blog.
    www.ateacherwithoutaclass.com

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  9. I have a few trifty book finding tips for you other than the ones someone else also said that were all great trips also try to find books through www.paperbackswap.com you can also try www.freecycle.org I have gotten tons of things through both of these sites! Also why not write a grant for your classroom library!

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    1. I'll be checking those sites! I've never written a grant, but that is definitely a possibility. Thanks!

      Crystal

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  10. I haven't read through all of the comments yet... so this may have been suggested! For leveled readers, Reading A to Z online is AMAZING! You need to pay for this, our school subscribed, but you can print books at each level. We have about 6 of each book, then had a volunteer bind them. The level is a little different than your typical guided reading levels so be sure to check out their conversion chart. But each story can have a lesson plan, and activities printed with it. You can even find leveled Readers Theater! It has been a huge help for when we don't have specific books at specific levels. Hope that helps :)

    Cora

    www.firstgradeexploration.blogspot.com

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    1. Cora -- Thanks for the suggestion! I hadn't even thought of Reading A to Z and my school has subscribed. Hooray!

      Crystal

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  11. I don't know how big your school library is, but once a week, I we go "book shopping" at the library. They are allowed to have 6-7 books, and only one of them can be a chapter book. The books are checked out under my name. My students also put their guided reading books in their book boxes.

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    1. I love this idea! I'm going to check with my librarian and see what she thinks. :-)

      Crystal

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  12. Hi! I have used many of the suggestions above (garage sales, thrift stores, Half Price Books, and asking parents with older students) but I also get so many books from Scholastic. If your class purchases books online then your class gets free books! For every book order placed online you get extra bonus points and in September the bonus points are awesome! I send home a flyer once a month and post in my newsletter and website the themes that we will be covering and also post a "wish list" of books that I would love to have in my classroom. This has really helped me collect many great titles.

    Another suggestion is your public library. I know that some will allow teachers to take out up to 50 books at a time! Many times you can even check out audio books as well!!

    Kristen
    A Day in First Grade

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